19 July, 2016

History

The Maltese archipelago is virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean consisting of three islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino sharing a population of 420,000 inhabitants over an area of 316sq km and a coastline of 196.8km. Malta is the larger and busier island where most commercial and cultural activity goes on, whilst Gozo is more rural and quaint characterised by traditional crafts and agriculture, Comino is largely uninhabited.

Through the centuries its strategic location gained importance with a sequence of powers including the Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Sicilians, Knights of St John, French and the British all of which occupied Malta. The colonisation played a crucial role in the creation of its rich history. In fact, the Maltese people are quite an extraordinary mixture as throughout the islands` long history, the many races that settled here all left their significant marks leading to an interesting mixture of styles and traditions, giving the island a unique cultural identity.

Malta gained independence from being a British colony in 1964, compromising into a republic in 1974 within the European Union and Commonwealth and joining the Eurozone in 2008.

Maltese is a distinct language, another result of our rich history. Its Semitic origin laid down the foundations for the Maltese alphabet so its sounds are rather Arabic with a few words of Italian, French and even English thrown in for good measure. With this Malta is fortunate to have its individual language.

The artistic heritage of Malta blossomed under the Knights of St.John who played a crucial role in enhancing the cultural heritage with the building and decoration of the many fortifications, palaces, gardens and churches. Malta’s long history of architecture was influenced by many Mediterranean cultures from Byzantine, Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance tastes. Beautiful architecture surrounds the island which boasts of 365 churches, many of which are little chapels tucked away in quiet villages.

Described as an open air museum, the capital city of Valletta houses the magnificent palaces and churches all of which have a strong historical value, one is overwhelmed whilst wandering the narrow streets. Maltese countryside is endowed with Neolithic temples dating back to 3600BC, the Ggantija predominantly is the oldest manmade freestanding structure in the world whilst the underground Hypogeum is magical.

The Maltese archipelago is virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean consisting of three islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino sharing a population of 420,000 inhabitants over an area of 316sq km and a coastline of 196.8km. Malta is the larger and busier island where most commercial and cultural activity goes on, whilst Gozo is more rural and quaint characterised by traditional crafts and
agriculture, Comino is largely uninhabited.

Through the centuries its strategic location gained importance with a sequence of powers including the Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Sicilians, Knights of St John, French and the British all of which occupied Malta. The colonisation played a crucial role in the creation of its rich history. In fact, the Maltese people are quite an extraordinary mixture as throughout the islands` long history, the many races that settled here all left their significant marks leading to an interesting mixture of styles and traditions, giving the island a unique cultural identity.

Malta gained independence from being a British colony in 1964, compromising into a republic in 1974 within the European Union and Commonwealth and joining the Eurozone in 2008.

Maltese is a distinct language, another result of our rich history. Its Semitic origin laid down the foundations for the Maltese alphabet so its sounds are rather Arabic with a few words of Italian, French and even English thrown in for good measure. With this Malta is fortunate to have its individual language.

The artistic heritage of Malta blossomed under the Knights of St.John who played a crucial role in enhancing the cultural heritage with the building and decoration of the many fortifications, palaces, gardens and churches. Malta’s long history of architecture was influenced by many Mediterranean cultures from Byzantine, Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance tastes. Beautiful architecture surrounds the island which boasts of 365 churches, many of which are little chapels tucked away in quiet villages.

Described as an open air museum, the capital city of Valletta houses the magnificent palaces and churches all of which have a strong historical value, one is overwhelmed whilst wandering the narrow streets. Maltese countryside is endowed with Neolithic temples dating back to 3600BC, the Ggantija predominantly is the oldest manmade freestanding structure in the world whilst the underground Hypogeum is magical.

The Maltese archipelago is virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean consisting of three islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino sharing a population of 420,000 inhabitants over an area of 316sq km and a coastline of 196.8km. Malta is the larger and busier island where most commercial and cultural activity goes on, whilst Gozo is more rural and quaint characterised by traditional crafts and agriculture, Comino is largely uninhabited.

Through the centuries its strategic location gained importance with a sequence of powers including the Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Sicilians, Knights of St John, French and the British all of which occupied Malta. The colonisation played a crucial role in the creation of its rich history. In fact, the Maltese people are quite an extraordinary mixture as throughout the islands` long history, the many races that settled here all left their significant marks leading to an interesting mixture of styles and traditions, giving the island a unique cultural identity.

Malta gained independence from being a British colony in 1964, compromising into a republic in 1974 within the European Union and Commonwealth and joining the Eurozone in 2008.

Maltese is a distinct language, another result of our rich history. Its Semitic origin laid down the foundations for the Maltese alphabet so its sounds are rather Arabic with a few words of Italian, French and even English thrown in for good measure. With this Malta is fortunate to have its individual language.

The artistic heritage of Malta blossomed under the Knights of St.John who played a crucial role in enhancing the cultural heritage with the building and decoration of the many fortifications, palaces, gardens and churches. Malta’s long history of architecture was influenced by many Mediterranean cultures from Byzantine, Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance tastes. Beautiful architecture surrounds the island which boasts of 365 churches, many of which are little chapels tucked away in quiet villages.

Described as an open air museum, the capital city of Valletta houses the magnificent palaces and churches all of which have a strong historical value, one is overwhelmed whilst wandering the narrow streets. Maltese countryside is endowed with Neolithic temples dating back to 3600 BC, the Ggantija predominantly is the oldest man-made freestanding structure in the world whilst the underground Hypogeum is magical.